Faculty News

Rosie Bsheer

Q&A With Rosie Bsheer

September 14, 2020

Rosie Bsheer is Assistant Professor of History in the Department of History and a member of the CMES Steering Committee. Her teaching and research interests center on Arab intellectual and social movements, petrocapitalism and state formation, and the production of historical knowledge and commemorative spaces. She teaches graduate and undergraduate courses on oil and empire, social and intellectual movements, petro­modernity, political economy, historiography, and the making of the modern Middle East. Her first book, Archive Wars: The Politics of History in Saudi Arabia, will be published in fall 2020 by Stanford University Press.... Read more about Q&A With Rosie Bsheer

Tell This in My Memory, Eve Troutt Powell

Readings on Race and Slavery with Specific Relevance for Middle East Studies

July 7, 2020

Rosie Bsheer, Assistant Professor of History, and Cemal Kafadar, Vehbi Koç Professor of Turkish Studies, both core faculty members of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, recommend the following books on race and slavery that have special relevance for Middle East studies. For information on locating books at a library near you, visit www.worldcat.org...

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Derek Penslar

Herzl Re-imagined: Derek Penslar Weighs the Impact of Theodor Herzl's Personal Power

April 14, 2020
Derek Penslar, William Lee Frost Professor of Jewish History at Harvard University, has long studied modern Jewish history from a global perspective. In his new biography of Theodor Herzl, Penslar examines how the founder of modern Zionism’s personal life influenced his political impact. He discussed Theodor Herzl: The Charismatic Leader with the... Read more about Herzl Re-imagined: Derek Penslar Weighs the Impact of Theodor Herzl's Personal Power
Melani Cammett

The Twin Crises and the Prospects for Political Sectarianism in Lebanon

April 9, 2020
In an article for the Lebanese Center for Policy Studies, CMES faculty affiliate Melani Cammett and Lama Mourad, Postdoctoral Fellow at Perry World House, University of Pennsylvania, address the question, “Will the financial crisis, exacerbated further by COVID-19, strengthen or loosen the power of Lebanon’s governing political parties?”... Read more about The Twin Crises and the Prospects for Political Sectarianism in Lebanon
Melani Cammett

Building Solidarity: Challenges, Options, and Implications for COVID-19 Responses

March 30, 2020

Social solidarity is a critical tool in the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, as political leaders call for major disruptive changes to everyday life and sacrifices for collective well-being. In a white paper for the COVID-19 Rapid Response Impact Initiative of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University, CMES faculty affiliate...

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William Granara on the Ottoman History Podcast

William Granara on the Ottoman History Podcast

February 27, 2020
During the 9th century, Arab armies from North Africa conquered Sicily, leading to four centuries of Muslim history on the island, which is now part of Italy. Sicily during that period has often been portrayed as an interfaith utopia where Muslims, Christians, and Jews lived side by side, giving rise to a cultural synthesis, but as CMES Director William Granara explains, the reality was more complex. In "Muslim Sicily and Its Legacies... Read more about William Granara on the Ottoman History Podcast
Mediterranean Cousins poster

Mediterranean Cousins: Tunisia and Italy on Opposite Shores

February 21, 2020

In October 2019, CMES Director William Granara spent part of his sabbatical year convening the first international symposium organized by the Tunisia Office of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies: Mediterranean Cousins: Tunisia and Italy on Opposite Shores, designed to examine kinship, exchanges, and divides between Tunisia and Italy across time.... Read more about Mediterranean Cousins: Tunisia and Italy on Opposite Shores