Justine Landau

Justine Landau

Associate Professor of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
Justine Landau

Justine Landau is a scholar of Persian literatures and cultures. Her research interests are grounded in three fields:

- Classical Persian Literature, with a focus on early court poetry (9th-14th c.)

- Poetics and literary theory

- Comparative and world literature

Her first monograph, De rythme & de raison. Lecture croisée de deux traités de poétique persans du XIIIe siècle (PSN/IFRI, 2013), investigates the advent of Persian literary theory in 13th century Iran and its two foundational texts: Shams-e Qeys-e Rāzī’s Ketāb al-mo‘jam and Naṣīr al-Dīn Ṭūsī’s Me‘yār al-ash‘ār. Drawing on a corpus of pre-Mongol panegyrics and prose works, her next book project explores the aesthetics of occasion and circumstance in early Persian court poetry.

An alumna of the École Normale Supérieure in Fontenay/Saint-Cloud (France), she holds a B.A. and M.A. in medieval French literature from the Sorbonne in Paris (France), and an Agrégation in French literature. She received training in Iranian Studies from the Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales in Paris, ‘Allameh Tabataba’i University in Tehran (Iran) and Columbia University in New York. She obtained her M.Phil. and Ph.D. (2012) in Iranian Studies from the Sorbonne Nouvelle in Paris.

Before joining the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at Harvard in 2015, she taught Persian language and literature at the Sorbonne Nouvelle (2003-2007) and at the University of California in Los Angeles (2013), and was a researcher at the Institute of Iranian Studies of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna (2010-2015).

Justine Landau is the founder and co-chair, with Hajnalka Kovacs and Sheida Dayani, of the Persian & Persianate Studies seminar at the Mahindra Humanities Center: http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/persian-and-persianate...

 

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p: 617-495-4654

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