History of Art & Architecture

Designing for Darkness: What Can Latin American Cities Learn From the Arabian Peninsula?

April 13, 2017

Andreina Seijas, an incoming doctoral student at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, attended the April 7-8 symposium After Dark: Nocturnal Landscapes and Public Spaces in the Arabian Peninsula, jointly sponsored by the Aka Khan Program at the GSD and by Harvard's Center for Middle Eastern Studies. In her Ciudades Sostenibles blog, Seijas writes about the challenges of urban design in the Arabian Peninsula, regarding especially the night-time urban landscape, that participants explored, and she speculates how some of the lessons learned and in progress in the Arabian Peninsula might apply to Latin American cities facing similar challenges.

2017 Apr 07

After Dark: Nocturnal Landscapes and Public Spaces in the Arabian Peninsula

Fri - Sat, Apr 7 to Apr 8, 4:00pm - 6:00pm

Location: 

CGIS South, Rm 020, 1730 Cambridge St; Piper Auditorium, Grad School of Design 48 Quincy St

The Aga Khan Program and The Department of Landscape Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design and the CMES Arabian Peninsula Studies Series present

AFTER DARK: Nocturnal Landscapes and Public Spaces in the Arabian Peninsula
In the Arabian Peninsula, public spaces are often most used after darkness falls and the temperatures with it. This symposium explores typologies of nocturnal landscapes common in the Peninsula, and similar hot climates. During this interdisciplinary event, we will ask who uses night-time landscapes and public spaces, what activities are peculiar to the night and ultimately, how to design for life after dark?

If you plan to attend this conference, please register here.

Traveling beyond the Classroom: J-Term Excursion to Tunisia

February 9, 2017

Brittany Landorf, an MTS candidate at Harvard Divinity School, participated in the Center for Middle Eastern Studies' 2017 winter session study excursion to Tunisia. "The trip reminded me why I love what I study so much, and I returned to campus this semester with renewed energy and new curiosity," Landorf writes. "Sometimes our classrooms can feel so far away from what we are studying (literally and figuratively); I think that immersive learning experiences like this are invaluable." Read more about her experience at the Harvard Divinity School Admissions Blog.

Video: CMES Tunisia Office Inaugural Celebration

January 17, 2017

Hear opening remarks from donor Hazem Ben-Gacem AB '92, CMES Director William Granara, Margot Gill, Administrative Dean for International Affairs, Harvard University, and Malika Zeghal, Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor in Contemporary Islamic Thought and Life, Harvard University, at the inaugural celebration of the Tunisia Office of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Harvard University.

Harvard Opens New International Office in Tunisia

January 26, 2017

Harvard’s Center for Middle Eastern Studies opened its first field office in Tunisia last Tuesday in an effort to expand Harvard’s global presence and provide resources for scholarship in the Middle East and North Africa region. Read more in the Harvard Crimson.

Center for Middle Eastern Studies Opens Field Office in Tunisia

January 17, 2017

The Center for Middle Eastern Studies (CMES) at Harvard University today opened its first overseas office, in Tunisia, home to a tradition of learning and research that extends from Antiquity to the present. The office and the year-round programs run from the location are made possible by the support of Harvard College alumnus Hazem Ben-Gacem ’92.

2016 Nov 21

The Persian and Afghan Romance of Alexander the Great: Part III “Alexander: God and Mortal”

5:00pm to 6:30pm

Location: 

CMES, Room 102, 38 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA

The Standing Committee on Medieval Studies, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, the Aga Khan Fund, & the Association for Central Asian Civilizations & Silk Road Studies

Dr. Michael Barry
Princeton University

Kurt

A Beautiful Mosque and the Dark Period of the Armenian Genocide

October 14, 2016

In an October 14 article in the Independent, journalist Robert Fisk writes about the Turkish city of Gaziantep and the "Liberation" mosque as a milestone on the journey between one great crime of the 20th century, and another seen during the Second World War. He talks with CMES visiting postdoctoral fellow Ümit Kurt, whom Fisk calls "perhaps the greatest font of knowledge on this period."

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