Government

Upcoming Events

2017 Mar 30

The Naksa Fifty Years Later: New Sources, Questions and Approaches to the ‘67 War

(All day)

Location: 

Williams James Hall, Lecture Hall B1, Lower Level, 33 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA

The Center for Middle Eastern Studies presents a conference

On the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the June 1967 War, this event seeks to explore new approaches to understand and rethink this pivotal and transformative moment in the history of the modern Middle East. At stake is the search for new sources that can shed light on the war and its long term repercussions for Arab societies.

Organized by: William Granara, Professor of Arabic, Director, Center for Middle Eastern Studies; and Khaled Fahmy, Shawwaf Visiting Professor in Modern Middle Eastern History; Professor of History, American University of Cairo

2017 Apr 13

Refugees and Migrants: A Comparative Study of Response--The UN, Government and Civil Society

4:00pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

CGIS Knafel 262, 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

The WCFIA/CMES Middle East Seminar presents

Karen AbuZaydKaren AbuZayd
Commissioner, UN Human Rights Council Commission of Inquiry on Syria; and former Special Adviser to the Secretary General for the Global Summit on Refugees and Migrants, 2016

News

Going Nativist

February 9, 2017

The future of America is as bright or as dark as the future of our immigrants. The battle over the travel ban echoes our history from the founding, slicing deep into the heart of American sympathies: Are refugees and migrants coming ashore to be seen as humble "guests of the nation" or as American as anyone, just for getting through the gate? In the February 9 edition of Open Source, host Christopher Lydon talks with Persian preceptor Sheida Dayani and others about the "who we are" question, between Immigration Nation and Fortress America, traversing all sorts of social, political, and historical terrains. Dayani also reads her poem "The Ordinary Man of this Neighborhood."

Swift Response to Trump Immigration Order

January 30, 2017

The Trump administration’s executive order banning refugees and immigrants from seven majority Muslim nations from entering the United States for at least several months has stirred a hornet’s nest of concern internationally, including at Harvard. Among other actions, Harvard President Drew Faust unveiled a plan for Harvard to appoint a full-time Muslim chaplain, with a search committee to be chaired by Harvard Divinity School Professor and Committee on Middle East Studies faculty member Ousmane Kane. Read more in the Harvard Gazette.

Why the Death of Iran’s Leading Moderate Could Strengthen Its Reformists

January 23, 2017

CMES AM candidate Amir H. Mahdavi, who is also a researcher at Brandeis University's Crown Center for Middle East Studies, writes in the Washington Post that, with the recent death of Iran's former president and leading moderate Hashemi Rafsanjani, many are concerned that current President Hassan Rouhani will be overpowered by the conservative religious establishment and a controlling Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps. But Mahdavi says that Rouhani may in fact emerge stronger from Rafsanjani's death.

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